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Freshly cut grass in the back of our vans smells just like banana skins, why?

Freshly cut grass in the back of our vans smells just like banana skins, why?

Today was like just any other day, out and about delivering our lawn services, a day where the weather was sunny and boy it was hot for a September day 28c. It seems to be a developing weather pattern where we get these sharp hot days in mid summer, really hot and then it drops off quickly into the dark days of autumn and onto winter, maybe its the way going forward. That's not too bad, something nice to look forward too after summer breaks.

 The lawn looking good with a 25mm cut, bit stressed but it does get used a lot.

The lawn looking good with a 25mm cut, bit stressed but it does get used a lot.

 

On hot sunny days like this the most important thing I can tell you about is to make sure you have a "sharp" lawnmower blade, the importance of the sharp blade is if you do have a sharp blade you "cut" the grass, if its blunt you "strike and tear" the grass. If you have a blunt blade what it means is the grass gets damaged and it will die back and go yellow and if your really careless with the cut it will go brown or "burn out" . So make sure you check your blade mid season, which is July onwards.

Today It seem to me that the summer was giving us one last blast before it packs up and goes elsewhere, the lawns looked tired, some well kept and some showing the signs of a year of harsh cuts and hard use. With our lawn plan services we often get to see the lawns on a weekly or bi weekly basis (lawnplan complete) but with some of our treatment only services (lawnplan basic) we only get to see the lawns on a handful of occasions. With that in mind we try and keep a record of the lawns conditions as the year goes on by taking pictures every visit.

A happy habit

For me I made a conscious effort to cut my own lawn this morning and I did it early doors 8am, again, I've got into the habit of giving it a cut every other day. I'm keen as mustard to try and get my own bit of green stuff looking its best. They often say a greenkeepers never have a good lawn at home because they have done enough grass care at work, but for me it's a great start to the day.

The cut was no different to any other day, I cut it at the same length and in the same direction. I quite like to cut my lawn in different directions depending on time of year, condition of the grass and what the cut length is and ultimately if anyone is coming over who might see it {if thats the case I always double cut the lawn, one time in one direction and the 2nd cut of the same length in another direction}. What I find with a fine lawn is once you get below a cut length around 15 mm the "stripy ness" of the lawn will become less obvious, you get a stripier lawn with longer grass (not many people know that! check a little video on cutting a stripy lawn here.  

I love the smell of fresh cut grass in the morning, its the smell of optimism and opportunity and Banana's!!

So back to today, when I cut the lawn I was strangely over come by the power of the smell of the newly cut grass. Which got me thinking what does the smell of freshly cut grass actually smell of? 

The funny thing about the smell of fresh cut grass is some days the cut gives off a smell and others it doesn’t. At a guess I’m thinking that they lawn gives off a smell when it has a bit more moisture in it, maybe it's when its had a flush of new growth, maybe it's because the ground conditions are cooler and the air above it warmer - so as the warm air rises the whiff of cut grass comes up too. To be honest I’m not sure but I do know that it's not a constantly delivered smell from every cut.

A bit of wondering around the web and came across an article in The Atlantic discussing that most languages have so few words for smells, it's kinda true in a way. I think we probably use very few words to describe smells on a day to day basis, not sure why, maybe it's not the thing to do to be too descriptive on one of the senses as its going to be so subjective, Piff and piffall!

SO WHAT DOES CUT GRASS SMELL OF?

 The smell of green

The smell of green

   Banana skins - the bananas you buy from Tesco, picked green and never really ripen correctly

    •    Rocket leaf - sometimes in the morning the new grass cuts can give off a smell thats quite sharp, green leaf,  dusty and a bit peppery

    •    Pea pods - its the inside of pea pods

    •    The one smell you often get when cutting a lawn is one that luckily doesn't travel far, the smell of the mower engine. Chuffing and blowing fumes.

{there are many other aroma notes you get from our van, the wiff of petrol, lawn treatments and dust are a few that come to mind} 

The one thing that we are all sure, even those that get hay fever is the smell of freshly cut grass is a positive one, one that congers up memories of summer and days out, the smell of hope and adventures, the smell of new opportunities. 

 Our vans are a fresh on the outside as the inside.

Our vans are a fresh on the outside as the inside.

Do our vans have the smell of fresh cut grass every day? Sadly not the cutting service typically only runs from March to November. 

Van - Ford transit van | Mower - Hayter pro | Aerator - Easy core 205 | Scarifier - Eliet Scarifier | Lawn feeder - scotts acupro 2000 |

We like to thank the guys at Artsigns in London  and De-sign harrogate. Both very good for van livery.

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How to grow a superior lawn - Lawn fertiliser & springtime prep

Welcome to our springtime lawn care review. This video showcases what we typically do in spring to get a lawn ready for the season ahead. In the video you will see Paul (a senior residential lawn specialist) carrying out a full range of key lawn care tasks from a simple lawn cut | aeration | scarafication | lawn fertiliser.

Van - Ford transit van | Mower - Hayter pro | Aerator - Easy core 205 | Scarifier - Eliet Scarifier | Lawn feeder - scotts acupro 2000 |

We like to thank the guys at Artsigns in London  and De-sign harrogate. Both very good for van livery.

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Lawn Striping - How To Mow Stripes In Your Lawn

Make your own lawn striper easily and then get those stripes that set your house apart from the neighbours'! Quick and simple with great results! How to Mow Stripes In Your Lawn. Lawn striping is easy and doesn't have to cost a lot.

Van - Ford transit van | Mower - Hayter pro | Aerator - Easy core 205 | Scarifier - Eliet Scarifier | Lawn feeder - scotts acupro 2000 |

We like to thank the guys at Artsigns in London  and De-sign harrogate. Both very good for van livery.

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1 easy step to a perfect lawn - does your lawn need aeration?

Does your lawn need aeration?

In short, yes!

You might not realise it but your lawn consists of thousands of individual plants, and often a mixture of varieties. Your lawn needs water and sunlight as a minimum to keep it looking green, but to get a really good lawn it will also need regular mowing, fertilising, weed control, pest control, disease control, aeration and scarification (thatch removal). 

Walking on your lawn (even when mowing it) and rainfall all add to the compaction of the soil in your lawn. When compaction starts to be a real issue you will notice obvious patches of water that do not easily drain away. You will also notice that the grass tips will start to turn yellow. Grass is amazingly tough stuff but it is not aquatic! Too much water and it will start to drown. We don’t want that do we.

To relieve compaction you need to aerate and we recommend that you do this every year to keep your lawn in really good shape. Aeration involves perforating the soil of your lawn so that air, water and nutrients reach the grass roots. This helps the roots grow deeply and produce a stronger, healthier, lawn. The soil in your lawn can be opened up with a hand-held hollow-tine aerator or you could even use the tines of your garden fork. If you have ever done this though, you will know that this is back-breaking work. 

So why not save your back and book us in to aerate your lawn? This September till March 2017 we are offering aeration for a flat fee of £45  (for lawns less than 250 m2). Book now to avoid disappointment. Your lawn will thank you!

Van - Ford transit van | Mower - Hayter pro | Aerator - Easy core 205 | Scarifier - Eliet Scarifier | Lawn feeder - scotts acupro 2000 |

We like to thank the guys at Artsigns in London  and De-sign harrogate. Both very good for van livery.

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Did you know - your lawn will help sell you house #facts

Selling your house? Have you got kerb-appeal? 

 Your lawn can help sell your house

Your lawn can help sell your house

Putting your home up for sale through an estate agent is just the first step. You expect them to market your home - but what are you doing to help market it yourself? 

Baking bread and the smell of freshly brewed coffee might be attractive for potential buyers once they are in your home. An attractive garden and well maintained lawn will help entice them in. 

There is an old adage that first impressions count . Yet I pass many homes up for sale where the home owners have just given up. The garden is unkempt and the lawn has given way to weeds. Not a very good first impression!

Research by This Is Money identified a well maintained garden as one of the best returns on money invested in your home, second only to the addition of a conservatory. In most instances passers by cannot see what lies at the back of your property. So, if you want kerb-appeal, you need to maintain your garden and tidy-up your lawn. This will enhance your house Dale with a very cost effective 88% return on investment, they say. A well maintained lawn costs significantly less than building work so why not book a lawn assessment from us? We can also recommend a plan that will get your lawn looking lovely! 

The equipment we use:

Van - Ford transit van | Mower - Hayter pro | Aerator - Easy core 205 | Scarifier - Eliet Scarifier | Lawn feeder - scotts acupro 2000 |

We like to thank the guys at Artsigns in London  and De-sign harrogate. Both very good for van livery.

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Three weeks to launch: become a franchise owner this month

Lower risk, the support of an existing brand, and no need for a business idea. But as important, franchising is also a very quick way to launch

 You can get started in less than 4 weeks

You can get started in less than 4 weeks

Thousands of entrepreneurs choose franchising as their route from aspiring to actual business owner every year.

Key takeaways:

  1. Understand how long it should take to start up your All Gardening Lawn Service Franchise
  2. Everything can be done in just 5 steps
  3. A bit of early planning is also key to a successful franchise 

An All Gardening Lawn Service Franchise guarantees you a tried and tested business model, the support of a national network, and the brand recognition of a business that’s been around since 2004. Which is all awesome……

But there’s one benefit an All Gardening Lawn Service Franchise boasts that’s often overlooked – speed to launch.  

Whether you’re launching your business whilst in employment, wanting to maintain a healthy work/life balance, or simply itching to get started, the time it takes to launch a business from scratch can be a barrier.  With the ‘business in a box’ format, a All Gardening Lawn Service Franchise can see your pre-launch timeline shrink.

Just how long can it take to get an All Gardening Lawn service franchise started…. 

          1: Explore your franchise options: Time required? One to three weeks

Finding the franchise that’s right for you will undoubtedly be the most important step in your process, and probably the most time intensive. But that doesn’t mean you can’t be strategic about it.

As a potential franchise owner, there’s one major time saver open to you that’s not available to other entrepreneurs – other franchise owners. When you zero in on the franchise option that appeals most, talk to other owners and get the inside track on the company.

Also take time to approach other lawn care businesses, we have a lot of focus on customer care and we really aim to up hold our Guarantee

Dependent on which franchise option you go for, this stage will have a big impact on your timeline – choosing franchises that require premises, specialist equipment and hiring staff will take longer to launch than a mobile business like All Gardening Lawn Service.

          2: Develop your franchise business plan: Time required? One to two weeks

The business plan is a crucial step in launching any business, franchise or otherwise. But by choosing a franchise, a substantial portion of the leg work involved may be covered for you. Much of the detail about the running of the business will come from us, and with potentially hundreds of near identical businesses across the country, market research should be a breeze. 

          3: Find funding to start a franchise: Time required? Less than a week

If you’ve done your research properly, a well-chosen franchise can be a much safer investment for lenders than a freeform business pitch. Not only that, but there are many funding options out there actively seeking to support franchises. 

          4: Complete your business skill-set and the obligatory start-up paperwork: Time required? Less than a week

Even if your franchise package has laid out the financials for you, pre-prepared the marketing materials, or offered an HR cheat sheet, your business will be stronger if you take ownership of these skills. Joining a business support programme can be done in a matter of minutes, and you’ll be well on your way to plugging any gaps in your knowledge.

There’s no getting around it. Paperwork features heavily for any start-up. But with a supportive franchise provider, the process can be streamlined. Support is also available from enterprise agencies, which can provide one-to-one business advice to help new starts fly through this stage.

          5: Prepare to launch a franchise: Time required? A few days to a week

Allow some time for the unforeseen. Even in a pre-prepared business, there’ll be eventualities you need to work around. Giving yourself a buffer will mean launch day goes as smoothly as possible.

The equipment we use:

Van - Ford transit van | Mower - Hayter pro | Aerator - Easy core 205 | Scarifier - Eliet Scarifier | Lawn feeder - scotts acupro 2000 |

We like to thank the guys at Artsigns in London  and De-sign harrogate. Both very good for van livery.

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Supercharge Your Franchise Startup

All Gardening Lawn Service is a Lawn Franchise with a big difference - we've been there, and done it!

The All Gardening Lawn Service has been developed by its founder to embrace all the best bits of the lawn care industry, and we have a dedicated seriously experienced startup team.

We support our franchises like no other franchise network, we help the franchisee develop a robust startup plan. We assist in supporting idea creation and innovation to help build and develop our franchisees. 

We are here to build new lawn businesses, we've devised "The Green Route" which is there to help new franchise owners build demand and awareness, build customers, achieve new business traction, hire team and grow into a profitable and successful lawn business all in the space of 12 months.

Now you can supercharge your own lawn care franchise startup by contacting us and having a chat.

Lets talk today...

The equipment we recommend:

Van - Ford transit van | Mower - Hayter pro | Aerator - Easy core 205 | Scarifier - Eliet Scarifier | Lawn feeder - scotts acupro 2000 |

We like to thank the guys at Artsigns in London  and De-sign harrogate. Both very good for van livery.

 

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Finding your passion means you’ll never have a job

Well just imagine if you could say your on holiday every day of the year.

If you find what you are truly passionate about, then finding your career will not be too far away. It’s a lesson I have learned from my years creating businesses. I’ve never had what I would call a job, but I’ve worked every day for just over 25 years.

What I've also learnt is that there is so much reward in giving your passion to others for them to enjoy and discover, 

It’s all about finding a balance between work and play – it’s all living. This is something Wade Davis, the renowned professor and anthropologist, knows well. So does the guy who has inspired my way of working since my 1st job on Oxford Street, London in 1986, I was just 16.

 Richard Branson - He Smashed The World Record For Fastest Atlantic Crossing On The Virgin Atlantic Challenger II 

Richard Branson - He Smashed The World Record For Fastest Atlantic Crossing On The Virgin Atlantic Challenger II 

Among some fascinating advice to young people that Wade offers, he has some views on the nature of work. “A career is not something that you put on like a coat. It is something that grows organically around you, step-by-step, choice-by-choice, and experience-by-experience. Everything adds up. No work is beneath you. Nothing is a waste of time unless you make it so. An elderly cab driver in New York may well have as much to teach you as a wandering saint in India, a madman in the Sahara, certainly a university professor.”

As Wade said: "If you place yourself in the way of opportunities, in situations where there is no choice but to move forward, no option but success, you create a momentum that in the end propels you to new levels of experience and engagement that would have seemed beyond reach only months before.

 Wade Davis - Anthropologist and explorer

Wade Davis - Anthropologist and explorer

“And you’ll find that the work you do is just a lens through which to view and experience the world, and only for a time. The goal is to make living itself, the act of being alive, one’s vocation, knowing full well that nothing ultimately can be planned or anticipated, no blueprint found to predict the outcome of something as complex as a human life.”

Whether you are a new graduate, a new pensioner, or anywhere in between, or before or after, then you have the opportunity to think about what you want you do with your life. If you can find your passion, it means you will never have a job. Now, I’m heading back to work.   

If you would like to learn more about how the All Gardening Lawn Service can give you a passion for life, why not take a quick look at our franchise offer.

The worst thing you can do is book a 30 minute meeting - put me in the way of your life, and If I can inspire you to run your own business excellent, and if I can't well it's only been 30 minutes in your whole living life.

Just give me 30 mins......

 Always the rebel, I'm sitting at the back in "the arm chair". Black top blue strip

Always the rebel, I'm sitting at the back in "the arm chair". Black top blue strip

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Need a lawn maintained in the North West Leeds area?

  

Need a Lawn maintained in the NW Leeds Area?

We have a lawn franchise in Bramhope, just ask us how can we help you?

If you’re looking for an lawn maintenance company in North West Leeds, why not get in contact? 

We work with many lawn owners from the North West Leeds area, providing specialist lawn maintenance.

We've taken a tour around one of North West Leeds most interesting towns, Bramhope. The more observant will know all about the ventilation shaft for the Bramhope Tunnel and maybe even the Grade II listed milestones from the Leeds Otley turnpike road.

The turnpike road was established in 1755 with tollbooths at Otley and Woodhouse Lane (and later a third toll bar was added at Headingley Village. This turnpike improved Otley to Leeds transport (which previously had journeyed via Cookridge and Burley) and made Bramhope more accessible. Although, the biggest expansion of Bramhope did not occur until after WWII. Sadly, the builders of the rail tunnel did not see fit to provide a railway station at Bramhope, which might have made it into a much more diverse and industrious village. 

 

Bramhope itself is listed in the Domesday Book but the history of the village possibly goes back much further than that, as the Ilkley-Tadcaster Roman Road crossed Adel Beck near Golden Acre Park. This is evidenced by Roman coins that have been found locally on occasion. Even further back, cup-and-ring marked rocks have been discovered all around the area (the major concentration being on Rombaulds and likely Moors), which indicates that this area has been inhabited for possibly many thousands of years.

After the Domesday Book, Bramhope (from Old English brōm+hōp meaning broom valley) was mainly sheep grazing land divided into granges for the nearby Kirkstall Abbey. Bramhope must have reached a reasonable size as it is recorded that the Black Death reduced the population to 34 adults. Sadly, little remains of any ancient buildings, but recently the town well was uncovered during road upgrade works in 1991. The well possibly fell into disuse when the building of the Bramhope Tunnel drained the lake on the opposite side of the road.

The most interesting architecture in the village is the “north portal” railway tunnel entrance, which resembles a Gothic-style castle with a side tower and turrets. A replica of this tunnel entrance in Otley Parish Church serves as a memorial to the 24 workmen killed during the construction of this tunnel. 

Bramhope has changed much over the years from its rural and farming roots to become a commuter village of 3500 residents. Today, Bramhope is under pressure to expand once more into the surrounding Green Belt but Golden Acre Park and the adjacent Breary Marsh SSSI will probably mean that Bramhope would remain a distinct settlement for a long time to come.

LANDSCAPING AND GARDENING COMPANIES IN NW Leeds

North West Leeds is also known for its near-overwhelming number of landscaping and gardening companies including:

  1. PWP Landscape
  2. North Leeds Garden Design
  3. Earthworks Garden Design
  4. FirstLight Landscaping Ltd
  5. Paperbark Garden Design
  6. Frances Hainsworth Garden Design
  7. Earthworks Garden Design
  8. Full Circle Garden Design & Construction

Much of the presence is thanks to the sheer popularity of the town, but it is also thanks to the great amount of top-class universities found nearby, which offer a fresh batch of graduates every year. Some of these include The University of York, The University of Leeds, Sheffield Hallam University and the University of Ripon. Whilst there may be less suppliers for specialist lawn maintenance in North West Leeds than other areas of Yorkshire, it is certainly an important location for Specialist lawn maintenance.

AND FINALLY. ON A TOTALLY RANDOM NOTE…

Jelly Tots were accidentally discovered in 1967 by Leeds scientist Brian Boffey, from Horsforth. He was trying to come up with a way to produce a powdered jelly that set instantly when it was added to cold water. Yum!
Read more: http://www.yorkshireeveningpost.co.uk/news/30-things-you-probably-didn-t-know-about-leeds-1-4524301#ixzz4Em50xPu1

The equipment we use in NW leeds:

Van - Ford transit van | Mower - Hayter pro | Aerator - Easy core 205 | Scarifier - Eliet Scarifier | Lawn feeder - scotts acupro 2000 |

We like to thank the guys at Artsigns in London  and De-sign harrogate. Both very good for van livery.

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Need a lawn maintained in the Pinner Area?

Need a Lawn maintained in the Pinner Area?

We have a lawn franchise in Pinner, just ask how can we help you?

If you’re looking for an lawn maintenance company in Pinner, why not get in contact? 

We work with many lawn owners from the Pinner area, providing specialist lawn maintenance.

Pinner is centuries old. It was one of the ten hamlets of the medieval Harrow Manor and is still the most easily distinguishable today. The name Pinner is nowadays considered to be of Saxon origin. Among the oldest written records of Pinner is one telling us that the church was here during the 1230s.

Pinner was the sort of village you learn about at school. Near the centre it had a church on a low hill with a street of houses leading down to the river. At the north was woodland and a large common or green. South of the street was a huge area subdivided into a few large fields and split up again into small portions. These were shared out among all the villagers, and as a rule they co-operated so that the same crop was grown on all the plots in any one field. This is the area where today the very large estates of 20th century semi-detached houses are to be found, and the two long roads the villagers used to get to their pieces are still here today – Cannon Lane and Rayners Lane. Rayners Lane used to be called Bourne Lane because it crossed several streams.

The area between the main street and the common or wood was for the most part given over to individually occupied estates of a few acres each on which co-operation was not necessary – only a few villagers had this sort of property. Roadways threaded between the properties and led to the houses, which were clustered in tiny hamlets whose names survive today – West End, East End, Hatch End, Pinner Green, Barrow Point, Nower Hill, Waxwell. The roads survive too. Some still have names going back to Tudor times or earlier – West End Lane, Moss Lane, Paines Lane, Love Lane, while others just as old have changed their names – Chapel Lane, Church Lane, Bridge Street.

All of this belonged to the lord of the manor of Harrow, and the villagers had their pieces in return for rent or work done. The lord kept some parts of Pinner entirely for his own use however. He had two large farms called Woodhall and Headstone. Part of Woodhall’s farmhouse is still there. So is part of Headstone’s house, as well as its barn and moat, and they form the Harrow Heritage and Museum Centre. Very different was Pinner Park, a 250-acre haven for his deer, protected from the depredation of local people by a high bank and two ditches. When needed his keeper would send deer to the lord’s table, or release some to be hunted in the neighbourhood. Today Pinner Park is known as Hall’s Farm, and parts of the old bank still exist.

In 1336 King Edward III granted a fair to be held in Pinner at Midsummer, the feast of its patron saint St. John the Baptist. It provided a chance for the inhabitants to buy things not usually obtainable locally and offered some welcome diversion. The natural site was just outside the church, which had been rebuilt in flint, completed a little earlier in 1321.

By Tudor and Stuart times there was a butcher, a baker, a candlestick-maker, a cobbler, a provisions man, even a tailor in the street, working from their homes. Some of the inhabitants who were doing well built houses which still stand, marking the old street and the hamlets. A few Londoners with money took an interest in Pinner, among them Sir Christopher Clitherow, Lord Mayor of London in 1635 who built a mansion on Pinner Hill, and others who bought Woodhall, Headstone and Pinner Park when the lord put them up for sale around that time.

Pinner continued to be primarily a place of people getting their living from the land, but by 1800 things were ready for a change. Many people had already sold their rights in their small pieces of land to more prosperous farmers and over the next couple of decades what remained of the great fields to the south were privatised, most small owners being bought out. This was the first great change in Pinner since medieval times and made it a place of a few farmers and many agricultural labourers. In the south Downs Farm was created in Cannon Lane, with land on either side. Much of the land along each side of Rayners Lane was acquired by farmer Daniel Hill who built a couple of cottages there for his workers. One of the families, living there for about half a century, was named Rayner, and the lane was renamed after these humble people.

The population of Pinner rose in the early 19th century as it did in the country as a whole. Most were ordinary folk who were accommodated in new houses added to the existing hamlets or along roadsides leading from them, on small plots created by the privatisation. The occupants worked on local farms, set up or assisted in the extra shops or businesses required by the greater numbers, or became servants.

The building of the London and Birmingham Railway, which clipped the north-east of Pinner in 1837, accelerated the trend. A station named Pinner was opened in 1842, and after several changes was finally renamed Hatch End in 1948. There were only a couple of farms nearby at first but with encouragement from the railway a new estate of well-to-do villas was built there by 1855 which was called Woodridings. It was an isolated estate and its residents were Pinner’s first commuters, using the train to Euston. They also employed a large number of servants, some of them drawn from Pinner.

In 1851 about 40% of the population of Pinner was engaged in agriculture or related occupations, but only about 15% by 1881, when the leading occupation was domestic service, which had risen from some 25% to about 30%. The main reason for the agricultural reduction was the movement from arable farming to the less labour intensive dairy farming and hay growing – these fields fed the horses which kept the streets of London grid-locked with traffic.

A school to cater for most of the children was founded in 1844, backed by the vicar and other worthies. The Commercial Travellers’ School, transferred to Hatch End in 1855, added two or three hundred more souls, largely confined to the school buildings.

The arrival of the Metropolitan Railway in 1885 enabled Pinner people, better educated by now, to take work in London, while Londoners could buy a home ‘in the country’. It gave rise to development of a slightly different sort, as streets near the centre of Pinner began to sprout houses on roadside fields sold by farmers, and new streets were laid out on chunks of fields sold by other landowners who lived close to the centre. By 1901 the population was 3366.

There was plenty of local recreational activity. There were entertainments – concerts, readings, bands, talks, magic lantern shows – in the parish hall at the foot of the High Street and in the temperance tavern called The Cocoa Tree at the top. There were flower shows, sports, Royal Jubilees and, of course, the fair.

By 1914 new neighbourhoods were appearing away from the centre of Pinner – North Harrow, St. George’s Headstone and a vastly enlarged Hatch End. Hundreds of men from Pinner served in some capacity during World War One, and many of those who died are remembered on the War Memorial at the top of the High Street in 1921.

Between the two world wars the physical expansion of London reached Pinner and went beyond it. The fields disappeared under large new estates and roads. A fresh neighbourhood appeared around Rayners Lane station. New shopping centres, schools and churches were needed. Cinemas were provided. In general the houses to the north were more expensive, and much of that area became known as Metroland, the name used by Metropolitan Railway Company to foster building along its line. People poured in. Growth continued to rise after World War Two, reaching more than 46,000 by 1961.

This was too large a mass to continue to be regarded as one entity. North Harrow, Rayners Lane, Headstone and Hatch End have their own identity today. What is meant by Pinner is more nebulous. But Pinner Village, a much used expression, now tends to mean the old heart of the village, that is the High Street and church, plus the nexus of those old lanes radiating from it. Many, though not all, of the oldest houses away from the High Street are to be found within it – Sweetman’s Hall, Orchard Cottage, Bee Cottage, Grange Cottage, The Bay House, and the three old houses at East End. The High Street itself shares many of the characteristics of village high streets further out in the Home Counties, being replete with timber-framed pubs, restaurants and antique shops. The village is still there, even if it is set within the matrix of Greater London.

LANDSCAPING AND GARDENING COMPANIES IN PINNER

Besides offering the best open parks in NW London, Pinner is also known for its near-overwhelming number of landscaping and gardening companies including:

  1. The Constant Gardener
  2. Haywards Mowing
  3. Limebok Landscapes
  4. GD Landscapes
  5. Jo Jamieson Landscapes

Much of the presence is thanks to the sheer popularity of the town, but it is also thanks to the great amount of top-class universities found nearby, which offer a fresh batch of graduates every year. Some of these include The University of London, The Brunel University, LSE and University Collage London. Whilst there may be less suppliers for specialist lawn maintenance in Pinner than other areas of the south, it is certainly an important location for Specialist lawn maintenance.

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Need a lawn maintained in the Harrogate Area?

Need a Lawn maintained in the Harrogate Area?

We have a lawn franchise based in Harrogate, just ask how can we help you? Get a quote today!

If you’re looking for an lawn maintenance company in Harrogate, why not get in contact? We work with many lawn owners from the Harrogate area, providing specialist lawn maintenance.

Regarded as one of the most beautiful towns in England, Harrogate was voted as the happiest place to live in the UK in 2015.

Although not as old as some towns in the UK, the name Harrogate can be found as far back as 1332 and by 1399. It was regarded as royal property when the possessions of the Duchy of Lancaster merged with the English Royal Crown.

Interestingly, the town actually sprang from two hamlets, which is known only thanks to an association with the nearby town of Knaresborough. When William Slingsby discovered the first mineral well in 1571, however, the town’s future was set forever.

Less than a hundred years later, the town was expanding rapidly and bathing houses sprang up all over the town as doctors wrote about the health benefits of Harrogate waters; drawing thousands to the town from all over the country, often to simply drink the water.

What’s more, the Enclosure Act for the Forest of Knaresborough saw to the protection of 200 acres of land, which included the springs and other parklands, bringing weary visitors in from the cities who were looking to escape the industrial smog.

By the early 20th century, it was clear that Harrogate was a popular destination among the elite, both from England and nearby countries such as France.

Indeed, although nearby towns and cities profited from the sourcing of coal, the manufacturing of steel and the weaving of cotton, Harrogate survived through the industrial revolution by offering fresh water to those simply looking to escape it.

Unfortunately, due to the Great War, the popularity of the town waned, despite it not suffering a single raid from Germany. Interestingly, however, Harrogate did not share the same fate 20 years later upon the outbreak of the Second World War, as this time the town provided a crucial element of safety for government offices that were evacuated from London.

Thanks to this need, Harrogate quickly established itself as an important commercial, conference and exhibition centre.

Although a great many towns and cities faced economic downturn during the 1970s and ’80s, Harrogate is not notable for sharing this problem, as it’s industries did not rely on the sourcing or manufacturing of raw materials.

Landscaping and gardening companies in Harrogate

Besides offering the third largest fully integrated conference and exhibition centre in the UK, and one of the largest in Europe, Harrogate is also known for its near-overwhelming number of landscaping and gardening companies including:

  1. Greenwood Gardening Services Ltd
  2. Winn Tomalin Partnership Ltd
  3. Bluecoat Wood Nursery
  4. Hocus Crocus
  5. Jamie Goddard Gardens
  6. Preserve Landscapes Ltd
  7. Michael Partridge Garden Design & Landscapes
  8. Katherine Dormer Garden Design

Much of the presence is thanks to the sheer popularity of the town, but it is also thanks to the great amount of top-class universities found nearby, which offer a fresh batch of graduates every year. Some of these include The University of York, The University of Leeds, Sheffield Hallam University and the University of Ripon. Whilst there may be less suppliers for specialist lawn maintenance in Harrogate than other areas of Yorkshire, it is certainly an important location for Specialist lawn maintenance.

And finally. on a totally random note…

In 2013, the town was also declared as “the third most romantic place in the world,” fending off the likes of Paris, Rome, London and Vienna.

The equipment we use in Harrogate:

Van - Ford transit van | Mower - Hayter pro | Aerator - Easy core 205 | Scarifier - Eliet Scarifier | Lawn feeder - scotts acupro 2000 |

We like to thank the guys at Artsigns in London  and De-sign harrogate. Both very good for van livery.

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Lawn Care Hacks - before and after photos are brilliant

{this blog is written by Phil Argent, The Dyslexic Blogger - so there might be a few typos, a few bits that don't seem to make sense, but should be a general good read)

Lawn Care Hacks - before and after photos are brilliant

So you think your lawn is bad, well to be honest most lawns we get invited to look after start in a bad condition (technically speaking we find that most lawns are underfed, over cut and just simply not looked after by anyone who cares - thats why were here.

 A before photo - this is quite unusual, but sometimes a lawn can run away from you.

A before photo - this is quite unusual, but sometimes a lawn can run away from you.

Where you employe a All Gardening Lawn Service technician, we have a really good process of sorting out the 1st visit. Once we've done that we take the time to have a really good look at the lawn, how its used and also how it might be looked after in the future.

The process often goes like this: 3 easy steps:

  1. Carry out the 1st cut - now the trick to the 1st cut is we just want to get it in hand, we also don't want to hammer it. So the rule is cut it down to around 70mm. This leaves lots of grass length for the plant to recover. We may have to cut the lawn 3 times to get it to this length but once there we just tidy it up and trim the edges.
  2. Assess 1m2 - what we now do is look at 1m2 of the lawn, all to often people will look at the whole lawn and then work out a program how to fix it. But its a lot easier just looking at 1 little bit, if we need to we may look at a few 1m sections. Once we've done this we can get a really good idea of what the problems are - moss, weeds, poor grass growth, no grass.....
  3. Design a program - this is the best bit, once we've looked at the lawn, and we've worked on it to get the 1st cut it, we can then plan how to get it back into condition. It can be very easy and can be done in just 1 - 2 visits. That said we like to give nature a chance and often design a program over a series of seasons so we can take into account how it responds as the year goes along. Technically this is better as we can then support the lawn into the following year.
 After photo - the lawn after the 1st visit, it took 3 passes to get the length down.

After photo - the lawn after the 1st visit, it took 3 passes to get the length down.

As you can see from the picture above, a lawn after the 1st visit can look quite tidy, but it also shows there it need care.

To watch a video of the whole visit and the process of getting the lawn down into condition watch it now:

To get a quick quote just fill in your details here

The equipment we use:

Van - Ford transit van | Mower - Hayter pro | Aerator - Easy core 205 | Scarifier - Eliet Scarifier | Lawn feeder - scotts acupro 2000 |

We like to thank the guys at Artsigns in London  and De-sign harrogate. Both very good for van livery.

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Lawn Care Hacks - 5 top tips for cutting your lawn correctly

{this blog is written by Phil Argent, The Dyslexic Blogger - so there might be a few typos, a few bits that don't seem to make sense, but should be a general good read)

 A perfect cut lawn - 

A perfect cut lawn - 

Lawn Care Hacks - 5 top tips for cutting your lawn correctly

Looking after a lawn is a careful balance of cutting, watering and feeding. There are many other tasks you can carry out but its all about the basics to start with.

Can you cut a lawn in the rain or when its wet
— Number 1 customer question

The best line I often hear from customers or prospective customers is "can you cut the lawn in the rain or when it wet"?

My answer to that is always the same, YES. Below are the 5 top tips for cutting the lawn in any weather. 

  1. Sharpe lawn mower blades - the one thing that is very common with all new or used lawn mowers is the blades are all to often blunt. They are either polished off because of all the cutting or they were never really that sharp when you first too ownership of the mower. The best tip is to take off the blades and get a kitchen steel and give them a good sharpen. The do not need to be pin sharp but what they do need to be is constantly sharp. The trick is to sharpen them up so you can cut paper cutting through the paper. Often you can hear and feel a sharp cut and also you can see when you have cut that the grass leaf has a clean cut rather than a "tear" the grass. A note on tearing grass, if its a very hot day, and people do like to cut there lawn on a hot day you need a sharp blade, if its blunt and you tear the grass the leaf will die back, just like a badly pruned plant.
  2. Cut high when its wet - Its often very hard to cut the lawn on a wet day or on a day with very heavy dew, on those days its best that you set the lawn mower blades at a setting a bit higher than normal so you just clip off the top leaf. By cutting off the top leaf when you will do is stop that leaf getting any longer and the whole plan will put its effort into producing the new leafs. Once it dries out then take the cut down to normal heigh.
  3. Less is more - If the lawn is longer than normal because you have been away or you have missed a cut for some reason, don't be tempted to cut the hell out of it, the first cut you do should be long and just the once. Then a few days later have a second cut at the same height again. Once you have a nice clean cut then start to progressively take the cut length down to what ever you want it to be
  4. Short lawns don't happen in one cut - this is really important to understand. If you want a nice lawn you have to take it a day at a time. Its important that you get an idea of the condition of the lawn when its long and then take the cut down gradually and look at how the lawn responds with each next cut. You might find that as the lawn gets shorter and the grass gets more stressed you may need to give it a feed or aerate it to get some additional stimulation into the root zone.
  5. Different cut directions - some might say its lawn art, and other may say I like the stripes. The truth is you need to cut the lawn in different directions to keep the grass growing correctly. Some grasses over time will start running in one directing and the new grass may set up secondary plants which root in the thatch of the existing grasses. This is bad news as one dry day when you push the lawn for a lower cut you may find the mower pulls up a whole section of grass. So its a good idea to have a common direction that you like but from time to time (every 4 weeks) change the direction.
Less is more when cutting a lawn for the 1st time
— Phil Argent - senior lawn guy

The one thing I have always found about cutting lawn is it should be a pleasure. The pleasure is from getting a consistent result, which includes grass condition, grass colour and a good length.

If you have a well cut lawn and it can be at any height it can easily be a show case for the garden. And in my experience if you have a nice lawn a un kept garden don't look that bad either.

You should you this equipment:

Van - Ford transit van | Mower - Hayter pro | Aerator - Easy core 205 | Scarifier - Eliet Scarifier | Lawn feeder - scotts acupro 2000 |

We like to thank the guys at Artsigns in London  and De-sign harrogate. Both very good for van livery.

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The Dyslexic Blogger

My name is Phil and I'm one of the lawn guys at all gardening lawn service. I'm also a proud owner of a dyslexic brain.

The shape of my dyslexia is like this, below is a list with some dotted highlight of my life:

  1. I remember being very tired at junior school classes
  2. Can really remember ever learning anything, did I go to school?
  3. I remember having some good mates that I lost as we grew up because they got the school thing and I didn't
  4. I do remember spending most of my senior school years in the book cupboard, on a small table with 3 absolute idiots, spent most of the time wondering what the hell I had done to be with them. I love them all but daff.
  5. The teacher at senior school was kind and "fluffy" but I don't ever remember learning anything
  6. When I did tests and was asked questions on composition - I had no idea how to answer the question, because a question with more that one sentence was un comprehensible by the time id finished reading the question. So I would always answer the question wrong.
  7. Mr Martin my maths tutor was awesome, but left. And so with him leaving did my chances of being in the right place. I don't remember maths after that.
  8. I had a good mate who was a computer programmer on BBC computers when we were just 12/13? I could have done that, but no teachers knew.
  9. I did loads of exams to just get a few passes
  10. I did do A levels but bloody hard, I learnt everything by learning repetition, answers became like pictures - good and bad on that.
  11. I did do Polytechnic, I did engineering
  12. I love bright people and the opportunity of learning my way
  13. I did do the wrong subject on reflection
  14. I thought I should run a business when I was young
  15. Working with others was nerve racking as it would expose me.
  16. Everything is done on email - Bloody hell thats a nightmare
  17. I have always enjoyed the company of super bright people, I only wish I could communicate correctly and process an output that I could share
  18. Getting things wrong and right is always a puzzle in my mind
  19. I never switch off.
  20. Relaxing holidays are hell
  21. Active holidays are fun  

There is more I can tell you, and I'm sure the more I write the more we will all learn.

If you fancy a chat you can find me on twitter @philargent or email at pjfargent@gmail.com or give me a call 07834 769978

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How to select a lawn care company

{this blog is written by Phil Argent, The Dyslexic Blogger - so there might be a few typos, a few bits that don't seem to make sense, but should be a general good read}

How to select a lawn care company

Today I went leaflet dropping, its something that I have to do every day - if I can - to keep business going. The thing about leaflets is its just a bit of brand awareness, its not the best sales tool in the world and to be honest its not going to tell you the potential customer what you will really get from the service you buy.

That leaflet is a way to getting one of many marketing actions working, I think I've come up with the assumption that it takes on average 3 leaflets, 1 or 2 occasions of seeing the van before anyone really locks the brand in and what the brand offers.

So, lets assume for the benefit of this blog that you have a demand for one of the services we offer, whether its Lawn Plan Basic, Lawn Plan Complete or Lawn Plan Renovation, or perhaps a new lawn. the one thing we do that all the others don't claim to do is "we work with grass". The others treat grass, kill weeds and do other treatments. But do they really understand the product they work with.

Working with grass

Working with grass is the job of a green keeper and its not an easy one, you have to consider how long it would take you to understand how to grow grass "successfully". What it takes and how many years you need to do it before you know how can be vast. Some people can say its easy. but the elements you have to consider are complex and not every lawn maintenance company will have the knowledge to understand - they won't have done there time. If the company your going to employ hasn't ever grown a lawn from seed, how do you think they know how to treat one.

The elements to growing a lawn successfully are listed below, and its worth saying that there is no exact order for carrying out each one:

  1. Correct lawn mowing
  2. Correct watering
  3. Correct feeding schedule
  4. Knowing when to mow and how short
  5. Knowing about the growth rate
  6. Knowing how the lawn will respond to a treatment
  7. Understand when a lawn needs aeration
  8. Making sure you only scarify a lawn when it really really needs it
  9. Understanding diseases (thats one word I really don't know how to spell)
  10. Knowing how a lawn will perform over a dry season/ wet season/ cold winter
  11. Understanding that moss is something you have to manage, you can't kill it
  12. How to over seed, less is more
  13. How to patch a lawn
  14. Know that ants are there for good
  15. Make sure you don't let a lawn burn out in summer (fine chance of that this year)
  16. Understand that cutting directions do need to change from time to time
  17. Know that a lawn will only get better or worst, and in some years it will fail completely for no obvious reason
  18. Understand what grass types work on what lawn
  19. Know that soil types make a difference
  20. Be able to communicate all of the above at the right time, so you the potential client doesn't make the lawn technical carry out the wrong task because you want it sorted fast.
  21. Nature is in control
  22. Understand that if you have a lawn you are just "a custodian' you don't own it

You can see that the list is vast, and therefore the experience you require to correctly look after lawns is not easily learnt and its not easy to share. The reason its hard to share it quickly is you have to live and breath the grass season for a year or 2 or more. The greenskeeper at Wimbledon has been there since 2013 but has year and years of knowledge. 

Did you know it take 15 months to grow one of the grass courts at Wimbledon.

You know more now:

So, you have established that your lawn company needs some knowledge, and therefore some experience of what they are doing. It shouldn't be a case of just put down a feed and spray. If thats the job for that time of year thats fine, but what happens if the lawn needs something a little more to grow it correctly?

Every lawn need either an experience lawn technician working on it or it needs someone who is working to a specific plan, that plan should be clear to you, and if its not you should ask of some information.

Its quite useful if you share information with the lawn company, its great to be sent photos and information from time to time about the lawn. If your lawn company is only coming to your lawn once every 12 weeks, (we do with some of our Lawn Plan Basic customers), its great if you share what you see happen when it doesn't look right. Its a sharing world these days with social media and you can tweet, post or blog what ever you see when you see it.

Building a annual plan:

Do keep in mind when you are selecting you lawn company, just give some thought to whether you need a one off service, pay as you go, or would it be better to set up a annual plan? after all one thing you should be able to understand now is no lawn is the same and no year is the same, so having a commitment to a company for the year will allow for both you and the lawn company to learn from each other.

Signing up:

You shouldn't "trial" a lawn company. Its a bad habit to trial every thing. It may be a good idea with a sport club, but growing something from scratch (no matter if its a renovation or new lawn) takes time and getting commitment on your part will give the lawn company a feeling of commitment to making it work. I'd also say I think its good to do that so you can get a "guaranteed service"

There you go, a few tips from me on how to select a lawn company, There is probably more to share but my brain feels like its pretty much got to a nice end.

Hope you enjoyed that. If you do please subscribe for regular posts

 

 

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Being Dyslexic can actually be bloody brilliant

I’m dyslexic. That’s right. Richard Branson, Albert Einstein, Henry Winkler and Orlando Bloom and I can all officially high-five each other. I'm dyslexic and I run a lawn company, why?

Some people ask me why is such a bright guy looking after lawns? We'll the truth of the matter is on the surface of my business I do look after lawns, but in back ground it's a absolutely huge brain looking at all of the complications of a world that is made up of water and land and on that land there is one part of it, a very big part that is grass - some managed and sum unmanaged.

I'm interested in both types. My mind never switches off, and being self employed is a great place for my mind.

This is going to be a rambling post, but I'm just going to go with it and to be honest If its got typos or grammar mistakes well I'll leave it to you to work out what I'm trying to say. Now please make sure you keep up.....

Discovering the power of my brain:

Over the years, I've held some great jobs for some big thinking markets, Virgin and QXL are 2. The bigger the companies ambition the easier it was for my brain to find a place in it. What my mind has the power to do is to model what the consequences are of an action on a macro scale, I have to say what this does mean is that on a micro scale I drown a bit. Now thinking on a macro scale is something most people won't be able to do. I had a makers Briggs test done some 12 years ago and I was "profiled" (I do love that word) as INTJ. To those of you that care about that stuff it makes me bloody unique and one of only 3% in the world (hello Bill Gates)!

I had always thought my mind was stronger than my place in conventional world, but the big problem and the one I have started to solve by setting up my own business was, In conventional world most people are processors and they have a fairly inactive mind. most people don't think.

Which is where the phase "thinking outside of the box' is so often coined in the "normal world"

It was only at the ripe old age of 45 that a customer of mine, who happens to be an Oxford academic who teaches and tests for people on the spectrum suggested that I took the test "for some fun" - "give you something to think about Phil".

So I took the test, and yep for sure I have something going on. But its not what you all think. I have a ability to think inside my mind about many models and actions at any given time. What that would mean to most of you "normal" people is I never seem to switch off. Well I don't, never ever ever do I get down time. And its one of the things I really miss.

How my brain get me to do things:

On the basis of it I run a lawn business, which is focused on 3 services - lawn plan basic and lawn plan complete and lawn plan renovation.

But behind the funky vans, nice website and grey t shirts is a huge world of digital data and global placements. Here is a list of tools that I use to manage my mind whilst also working on the lawn.

Digital Strategy - from the offing the whole idea of all gardening lawn service was to make it possible for people to "order" a lawn cut online. Over the years that thinking has developed and it is now firmly about how we as a business engage with our customers on many levels, not just the service but an understanding of the environment and our place in the world. We have a digital strategy because we think that where things are going and that where people will be found in the future.

Website development - maintenance and hosting - I have done all of website development, the current platform is very very function, and does just what we want it to do and not much more. We have realised that a website is just like a book, you look at it for information, it gives you choices.

Technology - We had a sad story back in the winter 2008 where our offices were flooded and in turn that lead to all our PC's doing destroyed. boy o boy a nightmare. But at the time it was the turning point for cloud based technology and subscription based business models. So awesome we move the whole platform to those various cloud based systems. and we have never looked back. We use everything from basic hosting, google apps for business for email and a shared calendar and a number of other digital platforms.

Digital marketing and social - from the very earliest days I have been using all of the platforms in one way or another, the thing that makes me laugh the most is that the whole bloody thing is about writing, with very few exceptions... So I have built a digital strategy that is on one hand flattering all you "normal " people but on the other hand "completely doing my head in". On one hand I love devlivering digital content because people interact with me, but on the other hand when I get it wrong... oh boy its soon wrong.

Data, analytics and optimization - and the land of a very happy dyslexic mind, lets go and look at a bit of data and see how the universe is interacting with me. Its a bit like old fashioned chess, its game play and its dynamic. I can easily spend a whole day looking at the data from so many angles and side that most "normal" people just would have no idea what it all looks like and where its all going. BUT - in the end there is always a robust conclusion and a series of actions. I have a the power to process huge, if i had some formal training I'd be a data scientist!! - Hire me!!

E commerce and CMS implementaion - Ok, were move past the website design stage, not its all about making the platform work. I've had many iterations over the years of our website. But I've come to the point that it really doesn't matter too much what it looks like but it more important that i know its working. And equally its important to know that the investment I put in is paying back. Keeping it simple has been a huge challenge with a dyslexic mind, but i'm leaning to get control.

Data Driven UX and design - Its true that sometimes people just know what to do and how it should progress. But thats just such an old fashioned way to do things, its nice and fun - but - lets get serious we should just do some planning, trial the site, take some data on board and take it from there. Worts thing you can do is get an agency to build your website if you have no data to provide them. It won't work!! trust me i've been there and done that!

Content creation - Here we go, its the world of digital content is everything but creating it is very very easy. what is more important is getting an hand on what "primary" content you want to create and how you initially want to share it. Its a bit like on fashioned PR. I like to think about what I would like to tell about what I've discovered.

A dyslexic conclusion

I don't like to think about "being" dyslexic as I can't quite work out what that means. What I like to think is having a "dyslexic mind" is bloody awesome and its something many many companies should employ, for several reason.

We are very very bright. We see opportunities in everything. We seek to make things better. We are survivors.

So, if you think its just a lawn service I run oh boy how wrong could you be! If you have a business that you think could be explored why not drop me an email - why? because I never switch off and its nice to have new idea and information to put into the pot... whilst I'm looking after lawns.

Subscribe to my blog... you could learn something thats "outside the box"

 

 

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